Here is the States, we are in the finals weeks of a long election cycle.  This is a critical time for candidates and their campaigns, as evidenced by the deluge of ads on television.  Even though I live in what is basically an uncontested state in the northeast, the ads seem more pervasive every week.  I can’t imagine what it’s like in key ‘battleground states’ like Pennsylvania, Ohio, or Florida.

Like almost every other heated campaign that I’ve witnessed over the years, political rhetoric and spin rule the day along with personal attacks and scare tactics.  In an election year where ‘Change’ is the primary theme, second only to the economy, some things don’t actually seem to change – misinformation, blatant lies, and personal ad hominem attacks are just the same as ever.

For those of us who have made our decisions regarding this race, we are disgusted by the claims of our candidate’s opponent, yet relish in the attacks that our guy counters with.  No matter what side you’re on however, don’t be so sure that your candidate is 100% honest.

Do any research and you will quickly learn that each side is intentionally distorting facts.  Actually, that’s being rather kind.  You can certainly make a case that each side is deliberately lying, but i want to keep this civil, so we’ll just say that they are being somewhat dissingenuous.

So why do I say this?  Well, aside from the ‘gut feeling’ that I have that all politicians are scumbags, it is pretty easy to actually check out the facts regarding the claims being made on airwaves across the nation.  When doing so however, it’s best not to rely on the mainstream media as they prove day after day that facts just get in the way of a good story.  Instead, utilize resources devoted to truth, where a carefull examination indicates that they are reasonably objective.

I’ve been following this years political season on factcheck.com, but snopes and politifact seem pretty good as well.

May I make a simple suggestion?  Don’t be a political pawn this season.  Check your facts before blindly believing anything that either candidate says.  Avoid spreading misinformation, even if it you think it helps ‘your guy’.  Inform yourself and help others inform themselves.  If everyone did this, the process would be about the candidates and their plans, qualifications, and abilities instead of political spin, rhetoric, and the usual nonsense.

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